The Future Of Adult By Darren Roberts
The place where sex and technology blend together perfectly.

Posts Tagged ‘internext_expo’

Soft robotics is a quickly emerging field that takes a lot of inspiration from marine creatures like squids and starfish. A light-controlled hydrogel was recently developed that could be used for control of these new robotic devices, but now researchers at North Carolina State University are taking the development of soft robotic devices to a new level with electrically-charged hydrogels.

The “ionoprinting” technique, as the team has dubbed it, uses a copper electrode to inject positively-charged copper ions into a hydrogel material (a highly absorbent polymer material that is nearly 99.9 percent water). The copper ions bond with negatively charged ions n the hydrogel’s polymer network, creating a more robust and mechanically stiffer structure.

Applying an electrical current then causes the hydrogel to flex. Although electrical fields have been used to actuate hydrogel materials before, this is the first time that electromechanically active electrodes have been used to drive the motion. Also, this is the first time that the binding of ions has been used to create a more rigid hydrogel network in this way.

As well as being able to fold hydrogels significant distances within seconds, the technology allows the application of modest voltages to locally tune the mechanical properties of hydrogels to create physically-reinforcing exoskeletons. The copper ions can be injected into specific sections of the hydrogel material for more precise movement, with the resulting pattern of ions stable in water for a period of months. The more ions that are injected, the greater the hydrogel’s bending capabilities.

“We are currently planning to use this technique to develop motile, biologically compatible microdevices,” says Dr. Orlin Velev, INVISTA Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at NC State.

This gives the technique potential in not only soft robotics, but also many other biomedical applications. Artificial muscles, enviro-intelligent sensors, actuators, biomimetic microbots, micropatterned thin films, cell scaffolds and drug-delivery are just some of the other potential applications for the technology according to the researchers.

The team’s paper is published in the journal Nature Communications.

The video below shows the ionoprinting process and hydrogels in action.

Source: North Carolina State University

Share and Enjoy !

0Shares
0 0

After a career of attending literally hundreds of conventions, seminars, and conferences, I can honestly say that there has been nothing I have found that compares to the Internext experience.  Anyone who has attended Internext knows exactly what I am talking about.

Like a proud father who has seen their kids off to adulthood, I can now sit back and reflect on the early years of what became one of the greatest tradeshows ever to exist. For over a decade I have set aside bits and pieces of Internext history and am looking forward to using this blog as a way to take a visual road trip back to a time that changed porn forever.

 

Share and Enjoy !

0Shares
0 0
Facebook Twitter RSS
Sexy Web Videos

ADVERTISEMENT

The Unsexpected Story

TOP STORIES

TECH NEWS
Esports pioneer Dino Ying talks to TechCrunch about the next phase of VSPN
Following the news that China’s esport giant VSPN (Versus Programming Network) has raised close to $100 million in a Series […]
Mon, Oct 26, 2020

ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS
Nevada Adult Set Reports COVID-Infected Performers
The Free Speech Coalition has issued the following statement regarding a report of COVID-19 infection on a Nevada adult set. […]
Sat, Oct 24, 2020

ON TWITTER

ON FACEBOOK

ADVERTISEMENT

Discount Healthcare